AchooAllergy.com Blog
Taking Vitamin B5, Pantothenic Acid, for Allergies
Posted by Shifrah on Monday, December 26, 2011
We've talked before about the positive effect of some particular nutrients on preventing and relieving allergy symptoms. For instance, omega-3, whether taken as a supplement or through foods, helps a great deal in diminishing eczema symptoms and even allergy symptoms in general. Making sure to get enough vitamin D also helps allergy problems.

Vitamin B5, also known as pantothenic acid, can also ease allergies. Specifically, as DigitalNaturopath.com describes, allergy sufferers who take pantothenic acid supplements before bed often find that their nasal stuffiness clears and they aren't awakened by excess mucus, stuffiness, or other allergy symptoms during the night. It should be noted, however, that taking too much of the supplement can induce nasal dryness.

Livestrong.com also discusses pantothenic acid in relation to allergies, and describes the nutrient's effect on allergies as follows:

"Pantothenic acid is needed to make coenzyme-A, which is necessary for certain chemical reactions to generate energy from carbohydrates, fats and proteins. Coenzyme-A is also used during the production of cholesterol, hemoglobin, brain chemicals and hormones, especially from the adrenal glands. The adrenal glands, which sit atop the kidneys, are particularly relevant to allergic reactions because they secrete the hormones during an immune response, such as cortisone. Cortisone is the primary hormone in preventing the release of histamine and allergic symptoms. According to "Biochemical, Physiological and Molecular Aspects of Human Nutrition," the single most important nutrient for adrenal gland function is pantothenic acid; insufficient levels of pantothenic acid reduce the necessary amounts of cortisone from being secreted."


Interestingly, there is a possibility that pantothenic acid deficiency could be involved in allergies. Dosages for supplementation fall between 100mg and 500mg. Or, you can get pantothenic acid in food rich in the nutrient, including organ meats, fatty fish, shellfish, yeast, egg yolks, avocado, spinach, broccoli, mushrooms, and dairy products. Treating allergies with pantothenic acid would be a good topic to discuss with your allergist.


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